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Developmental Consequences of Early Parenting Experiences: Self-recognition and self-regulation in three cultural communities

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Developmental Consequences of Early Parenting Experiences: Self-recognition and self-regulation in three cultural communities

Date of publication: 
01 Jan 2004

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Authors: 
Keller, Heidi
Yovsi, Relindis
Borke, Joern
Kärtner, Joscha
Jensen, Henning
Papaligoura, Zaira
Publisher: 
Child Development
Publication type: 
Analysis
Other Documents
Studies, Reviews and Research

This study relates parenting of 3-month-old children to children’s self-recognition and self-regulation at 18 to 20 months. As hypothesized, observational data revealed differences in the sociocultural orientations of the 3 cultural samples’ parenting styles and in toddlers’ development of self-recognition and self-regulation. Children of Cameroonian Nso farmers who experience a proximal parenting style develop self-regulation earlier, children of Greek urban middle-class families who experience a distal parenting style develop self-recognition earlier, and children of Costa Rican middle-class families who experience aspects of both distal and proximal parenting styles fall between the other 2 groups on both self-regulation and self-recognition. Results are discussed with respect to their implications for culturally informed developmental pathways. Alliance Materials

Audience: 
CP AoR and Coordination Groups
CP Practitioners
Humanitarian Field workers
Other Humanitarian Actors
Country(s) this content is relevant to: 
Cameroon
Costa Rica
Greece

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