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Initiatives

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Initiatives

The Alliance Working Groups and Task Forces have developed a series of initiatives that align to the current Strategic Plan. Click on the topics below to see how you can participate in, or benefit from, these initiatives.

Both family separation and detention — unaccompanied or as a family — have proven to be detrimental to children’s overall development and long-term wellbeing. With this in mind, the Alliance developed an advocacy brief to address the separation and detention of children/families along the southern US border. The Alliance also collaborated with the Better Care Network on a second brief to call for improvements on interim care. Both briefs were collaboratively-developed and reflects best practice principles derived from research, field work and international standards of care and protection for children.

The Alliance’s Child Protection Minimum Standards Working Group has developed a new guidance note and briefing paper for child protection practitioners on how to ensure that children’s protection needs are considered in preparation for, and in response to, infectious disease outbreaks. These resources were developed in response to an identified gap in available guidance for child protection responses during public health emergencies.

After a multi-stage, collaborative process, the Alliance for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action has defined its strategic priorities for 2018−2020.  These priorities—integrated programming, evidence-based programming, and localisation—are driving the Alliance’s work and, most importantly, the work plans of its four working groups and six task forces. The Alliance's nearly 100 member organisations are working together to ensure the fulfilment of the strategic plan and work plan. UNICEF co-leads the Alliance with Save the Children and also co-leads the Learning and Development Working Group and the Community-Based Child Protection and Case Management Task Forces within the Alliance. 

In the year 2017, 222 violent conflicts were fought worldwide. When armed conflicts erupt, at least 10 per cent of all explosive weapons fired, dropped or launched remains unexploded. Landmines, explosive weapon remnants and unused ordnance left behind by combatants contaminate fields, streets and playgrounds. These weapons constitute a persistent, deadly threat to communities. Children are disproportionally affected by such explosive remnants of war.

It is challenging, or too often impossible, to prevent the use of explosive weapons in warfare. However, all accidental explosions of explosive remnants and landmines are preventable.

In May 2018, the Alliance and the UNICEF Child Protection in Emergencies (CPiE) team, in collaboration with UNICEF’s Disability Section and the United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS), led a webinar on ‘Mine Risk’  to mobilise action around this issue. The webinar drew strong participation from the child protection sector, and the recording has been widely viewed on Facebook and other social media (more than 500 times on some platforms).

 

The Alliance for Child Protection in Humanitarian Action (The Alliance) and the Inter-Agency Network of Education in Emergencies (INEE), in partnership with Elevate Children Funders Group and International Education Funders Group, held a joint meeting in Nairobi 15-16 October 2018. The two-day roundtable brought together actors from both sectors to consider how the CPHA and EiE sectors could complement and reinforce each other through complementary programming at the field level. This was followed by the Alliance’s annual meeting and INEE’s biannual meeting. 

Even if you were unable to attend the Roundtable in person, there are a variety of ways for you to interact: 

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To contact us, you can send an email to info@alliancecpha.org or use the form on our contact page